Comments for Beginners... fly tying.  2018- 2019

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All,

For Session 4, which is Saturday February 16, 2019 we will be tying the original Walt's Worm.  Here is a link about tying this fly. Original Walt's Worm            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAf1FsBrlzA

You will discover that there are many variations to the Walts Worm if you look it up.

I also encourage you to visit Tactical Fly Fishers site and see the video of Devin Olsen tying the Pliva Perdigon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-tuKpwbrX0&t=382s

 
Info below is about Session 3. January 19, 2019
 

Our Session 3, which was held on a rainy cool Saturday was very successful.  We had 15 folks in the beginners tables which is the maximum number we have had, and the advanced tiers had 8 tiers (Total 23).  It was too wet and cold to fish or work in the yard or even play golf.  February will be probably good turnout also unless it is unseasonably warm.  Then many will chose to go fishing.

This year we have packed the materials for each fly in individual plastic bags.  This speeds up getting materials to each tier.  The subject for the day was to tie soft hackle flies.

Below is one we tied. 
Arkansas Red Butt


Arkansas Red Butt

arkansas red butt -1

Partridge and Orange Below
partridge & orange_4749

We also tied a Partridge and Orange which when I get time I will post a photo (just did) and also some interesting details.  See photo directly above.   Tied in our class as was the Arkansas Red Butt.

  to be continued  When we started tying the Partridge and Orange, we each had a piece of Pearsall Silk Orange thread about 18 inches long.  I found it very slippery and quite a bit larger than what I have been using. The P & O is  a classic fly and quite old.  I found and excellent link about the history and also how to tie the P &O.    One of the distinguishing things about the thread is that is a silk and I am told that it does not change its color under water like so many of our threads.  The author of the linked website tells a different story, so you should read it here.   

https://www.maineflyfish.com/forums/index.php?/topic/19771-partridge-orange/



I have not studied the P&O under water, but think I will the next time I am on the water.  I wanted to tie the P & O in its original form.   I checked Google to see about the Pearsall thread and in the process got sidetracked.  The thought I was on was how hard it was to get enough tension with not having the thread on the bobbin.  Since I could not get good tension on the thread I simply tied gold Silk thread to a bobbin that was already threaded.  I took a photo of it and post here later.  Simple and pretty effective.

Photo of bobbin and  tied in Pearsall’s Silk Gold

 


*******************************
ALL         Information below was published January 17th 2019

Below is some information about upcoming fly tying classes and some information about our two previous classes.  This coming Saturday is our 3rd class and we will be tying the flies listed directly below.

For January 19th 2019 -  Session 3  Arkansas Red Butt Soft Hackle,  Partridge and Orange Soft Hackle, and the Griffith Gnat

We are on our third of five fly tying classes.  The flies we choose to talk about and tie are ones that illustrate basic fly tying techniques.  Each Saturday's lessons build on the previous months class. We like to use some traditional flies that have been around for a long time that still catch lots of trout.  So far this year we have tied, Pheasant Tailed Nymphs, Hare's Ear Nymph, and the Girdle Bug ( which is a Stone Fly imitation and with a change in body color and legs is now called Pat's Rubber Legs.  Also on the list is the  Woolly Bugger which is a type of streamer.

February 16th Session 4  We will be tying some of the flies used in Competitive fly fishing.  We will be tying the Pliva Perdigon, The original Walt's Worm. and the Devin Olsen's Blowtorch.  All of these flies have one thing in common.  They get down to the bottom fast, and they don't have a lot of impediments like legs and feathers to slow them down.

On March 16, Session 5  We will tie some dry flies.  They will be Elk Hair Caddis, the Sparkle Dun, and the Elk and CDC dry fly.  For those of you who do not know, these flies float on the surface rather than sink, and some Dry Flies should be in your fly box when the fish are feeding on the surface.

What I have refused to tie up to this point is the Squirmy Wormy, and the Mop Fly.  I do use and tie Y2K and some egg patterns, and the San Juan Worm. You might say why do you make a distinctions?  I guess you could say I am a little Old School in that regard.

There are literally thousands of flies out there to be tied and bought.  Fish are attracted to shiny objects, but that does not mean that they will eat them on a continuing basis.  You can take your pick, but so far, I have decided there are lots of other flies than a Mop Fly or a Squirmy Wormy to entice a fish to eat.  I like to think that a good Pheasant Tail Nymph or Hare's Ear Nymph over the long haul will catch more fish in different conditions.

Natural flies, especially nymphs and midges usually are in Mother Nature's colors: brown, grey, black, and various shades of green.  Many natural insects have some red, orange or yellow that can trigger a strike. We now call these Hot Spots, and you will see Hot Spots on many if not most modern flies.  I like to use a very small piece of green holographic tinsel as a hot spot on most of the Pheasant Tail Nymphs I tie.  It works great and although I could buy a spool of similar tinsel ($2.50 to $3.25 each), my wife got me a Christmas ornament on sale for a quarter (25 cents) or so about ten years ago, and I have been using it ever since, cutting off a small piece of tinsel and placing it on the top of the wing case.

For the current Class Session 3 that will be on January 19, 2019, we will be tying some soft hackle flies.  We have the Griffith gnat which is a very effective fly that is often used as a trailer on a streamer, or as a Dry and Dropper.  If you do not know these terms, as you begin to tie them, you will understand.  The Partridge and Orange is a very old Soft Hackle English fly. There is also a Partridge and Green, Partridge and Red.  Learning how to tie soft hackles is a very beneficial skill to have if you are a fly tier.

Prior to our class it will be helpful if you see a video of one of the flies we will be tying.  There is an excellent English fly tier named Dave McPhail ( I had the last name confused with Tim Cammiss) who has an online course and really ties beautiful flies.   Preparing a partridge feather for tying the Partridge and Orange is not a difficult task, but understanding what you have to do takes a little getting used to.  David McPhail has a piece called the Partridge and Orange and the Greenwells Glory.  The parts I am interested in you reading are paragraphs about trimming the hackle.  There also is a photo of a well-tied Partridge and Orange. as well as a video by David McPhail tying the fly.
Here is the link:  http://learnflytying.co.uk/the-partridge-and-orange-and-the-greenwells-glory.html


Here is a second video that is fairly good is about tying the Partridge and Orange. Note the difference in the way they prepare the partridge hackle. Check it out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04izjtrNKX8


  We will talk about this.

Since I have gone on about preparing the Partridge hackle, I learned by watching Hans Weienmann.  The tip of the hackle is very fragile and he strips the feather and usually ties in the heavier part of the stem.  Personally I prefer this technique.  goggle Hans Weienmann and Partridge and Orange. or here is the direct link is below
https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=hans+weilimann+tying+partridge+and+orange&view=detail&mid=724BFD2E3A 0 FC12D09D1724BFD2E3A0FC12D09D1&FORM=VIRE


I also like the web site Troutbitten because Dominick Swentosky writes well and says some profound things IMO.   We will not be tying the SuckerSpawn, however the comments he makes are good.  Read the quote below and then check the link below his quote. I think you will find it interesting too.

You can get a trout’s attention with a host of different patterns. Bright beads, flashy materials, wiggly legs and sheer size all stand out in the drift, and trout take notice. But interest and curiosity do not necessarily lead trout into the net. In fact, many of the attention getting materials we attach to a hook simply turn trout off, giving them a reason not to eat the fly.

On the other hand, while drab and flat patterns have their moments, it often takes a little sparkle, a little color, flash or wiggle, to turn trout on. The trick then, is finding the right elements to seal the deal — a simple combination of materials that is just enough to convince a trout, but not too much either. Enter: the Sucker Spawn . . .

Continue reading Troutbitten Fly Box — The Sucker Spawn at Troutbitten.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yG7MhSZVWC



All for now.
See you Saturday January 19, 2019

Jack McNeary

All,

Below is some information about upcoming fly tying classes and some information about our two previous classes.  This coming Saturday is our 3rd class and we will be tying the flies listed directly below.

For January 19th 2019 -  Session 3  Red Butt Soft Hackle,  Partridge and Orange Soft Hackle, Griffith Gnat

We are on our third of five fly tying classes.  The flies we choose to talk about and tie are ones that illustrate basic fly tying techniques.  Each Saturday's lessons build on the previous months class. We like to use some traditional flies that have been around for a long time that still catch lots of trout.  So far this year we have tied, Pheasant Tailed Nymphs, Hare's Ear Nymph, and the Girdle Bug ( which is a Stone Fly imitation and with a change in body color and legs is now called Pat's Rubber Legs.  Also on the list is the  Woolly Bugger which is a type of streamer.

February 16th Session 4  We will be tying some of the flies used in Competitive fly fishing.  We will be tying the Pliva Perdigon, The original Walt's Worm. and the Devin Olsen's Blowtorch.  All of these flies have one thing in common.  They get down to the bottom fast, and they don't have a lot of impediments like legs and feathers to slow them down.

On March 16, Session 5  We will tie some dry flies.  They will be Elk Hair Caddis, the Sparkle Dun, and the Elk and CDC dry fly.  For those of you who do not know, these flies float on the surface rather than sink, and some Dry Flies should be in your fly box when the fish are feeding on the surface.

What I have refused to tie up to this point is the Squirmy Wormy, and the Mop Fly.  I do use and tie Y2K and some egg patterns, and the San Juan Worm. You might say why do you make a distinctions?  I guess you could say I am a little Old School in that regard.

There are literally thousands of flies out there to be tied and bought.  Fish are attracted to shiny objects, but that does not mean that they will eat them on a continuing basis.  You can take your pick, but so far, I have decided there are lots of other flies than a Mop Fly or a Squirmy Wormy to entice a fish to eat.  I like to think that a good Pheasant Tail Nymph or Hare's Ear Nymph over the long haul will catch more fish in different conditions.

Natural flies, especially nymphs and midges usually are in Mother Nature's colors: brown, grey, black, and various shades of green.  Many natural insects have some red, orange or yellow that can trigger a strike. We now call these Hot Spots, and you will see Hot Spots on many if not most modern flies.  I like to use a very small piece of green holographic tinsel as a hot spot on most of the Pheasant Tail Nymphs I tie.  It works great and although I could buy a spool of similar tinsel ($2.50 to $3.25 each), my wife got me a Christmas ornament on sale for a quarter (25 cents) or so about ten years ago, and I have been using it ever since, cutting off a small piece of tinsel and placing it on the top of the wing case.

For the current Class Session 3 that will be on January 19, 2019, we will be tying some soft hackle flies.  We have the Griffith gnat which is a very effective fly that is often used as a trailer on a streamer, or as a Dry and Dropper.  If you do not know these terms, as you begin to tie them, you will understand.  The Partridge and Orange is a very old Soft Hackle English fly. There is also a Partridge and Green, Partridge and Red.  Learning how to tie soft hackles is a very beneficial skill to have if you are a fly tier.

Prior to our class it will be helpful if you see a video of one of the flies we will be tying.  There is an excellent English fly tier named Dave McPhail who has an online course and really ties beautiful flies.  butiful  Preparing a partridge feather for tying the Partridge and Orange is not a difficult task, but understanding what you have to do takes a little getting used to.  David Cammiss has a piece called the Partridge and Orange and the Greenwells Glory.  The parts I am interested in you reading are paragraphs about trimming the hackle.  There also is a photo of a well tied Partridge and Orange. as well as a video by David Cammiss tying the fly.
Here is the lilnk:  http://learnflytying.co.uk/the-partridge-and-orange-and-the-greenwells-glory.html

Here is a second video that is fairly good is about tying the Partridge and Orange. Note the difference in the way they prepare the partridge hackle. Check it out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04izjtrNKX8  We will talk about this.

I also like the web site Troutbitten because Dominick Swentosky writes well and says some profound things IMO.   We will not be tying the SuckerSpawn, however the comments he makes are good.  Read the quote below and then check the link below his quote. I think you will find it interesting too.

You can get a trout’s attention with a host of different patterns. Bright beads, flashy materials, wiggly legs and sheer size all stand out in the drift, and trout take notice. But interest and curiosity do not necessarily lead trout into the net. In fact, many of the attention getting materials we attach to a hook simply turn trout off, giving them a reason not to eat the fly.

On the other hand, while drab and flat patterns have their moments, it often takes a little sparkle, a little color, flash or wiggle, to turn trout on. The trick then, is finding the right elements to seal the deal — a simple combination of materials that is just enough to convince a trout, but not too much either. Enter: the Sucker Spawn . . .

Continue reading Troutbitten Fly Box — The Sucker Spawn at Troutbitten.

 All for now, see you Saturday.

Jack McNeary
Attachments area

Preview YouTube video Beginner's Fly Tying Series - the Partridge & Orange wet fly
 

partridge & orange_4749

 

 


 

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