0bad0a green

Information
about the Fall
Cankerworm
2017

JackMcNeary.com
Comments, Facts, and Articles about
Environmental Issues, Ponds and Watergardens, Outdoor Interest

You Don't Know Where You Are Going Until You Know Where You Have Been.

Environmental Page

Environmental Issues cover a lot of territory.  Water, Fracking, XL Pipeline, Waste Water, Methane, Global Warming, almost anything we do requires Water.  Check the links to the left.
On this page are references to important stories concerning the environment.  Many of the references deal with pollution and mining problems.  Heavy industry on an international scale has created many problems over the centuries.  Exploration for coal, metals, oil and timber have had their share of problems.  There are no easy answers, but we can learn from what has happened before.  On these pages, we will explore some of those things that shape our lives today.
Water has been and is looming as a world wide issue.  Storage, inter-border use are things with which we should all be acquainted.  Here is an excellent site that tells us about water.  If you have any concerns about the future of your children and grandchildren, check it out.   http://water-is-life.blogspot.com/   Go particularly to January 2nd 2012.

In addition, you will find information about other things that I find interesting. Check the list to the left sidebar for some of these.  I like the outdoors and you will find photos and other information

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHol4ICeDoo
Jefferson Island and Lake Peigneur

Jefferson Island

have been fascinated by several environmental disasters that I have found in searching the Internet.  The one below is quite a story.  Check the link
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHol4ICeDoo
Jefferson Island and Lake Peigneur
 ...... a freak engineering disaster
Check out the disappearing lake.  This is really fascinating to watch.  You will see barges with trucks on board sucked into a vortex only to be spit back up as sea water rushes into the lake.

might be in the wrong place

Charlotte trees

Charlotte’s Trees  8/16/2008


I live in a neighborhood that has lots of large willow oaks.  Most of the trees are mature and 36 to 40 or more inches in diameter at 48 inches of the ground.  These trees are 80 to 90 feet tall and provide a wonderful canopy over the street.  There are some smaller trees interspersed in voids where other trees have died, but in general the larger trees are showing the most distress.
What can be done about it?            Update to trees in Charlotte
Nature has to help revive the trees but we can help by supplying water to those that are suffering.  In my case I have a large willow oak in the back yard that looked pretty bad the last two years after the cankerworm attacks in the spring.  We are on drought restrictions and can only water with rotary type irrigation one day a week.  Drip irrigation because it is much more efficient is allowed.  
I have installed a ring of drip line about 10 feet from the tree all the way around it.  This line is attached to an existing drip zone that waters a shrubbery bed in the back yard.  If you are not familiar with drip irrigation, this line has emitters built into it on 12 inch centers.  I hold it down to the ground with landscape staples which are about six inches long and made of steel.  They anchor the drip line down so after a few mowings, the line is invisible and below the mower height of 3 inches.
This tree has revived and I have now done the same to two large willow oaks in the front yard.
If this is not an option to you, then you can hand water the tree or hook up a drip line to your faucet.  Battery operated timers are available that can automatically activate a drip zone.
A brief note about Fall Cankerworms
November is the time of year we get concerned in this part of the country about fall cankerworms.  If you want to see what last year (2010-2011 looked like.)    Click here for information on 2012 cankerworms information.  Cankerworm information for 2017 is here.

 

JackMcNeary.com 
3521 Monroe Rd, Charlotte, NC 28205
Phone: 704.618-621
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